T 97 Sniper Rifles. As noted in the Collector’s Guide to Imperial Japanese Handguns 1893-1945 the serial numbers assigned to this small population of Type-14’s were taken from frames that had previously … Excellent condition and crisp Royal Chrysanthemum and Type 38 stamp on receiver. I think that was the exact point that my elation of getting a great … Nagoya Arsenal Type 99 Rifle (Probably 8th Series but Not Marked) w/Painted Markings Having been given a reminder by this thread: Type 38 Arisaka Short Rifle with Kanji it seemed like a good time to do a photo shoot of this rifle. Nagoya Arsenal, Japanese, T94 $ 1,995.00. The underside of the bolt handle, the extractor, the firing pin and the … Overall it feels … LSB#: 180604KM41 Make: Nagoya Arsenal, Japan Model: Arisaka, Type 99 Serial Number: 12026 Year of Manufacture: 1939 - 1943 Caliber: 7.7x58mm (7.7 Jap) Action Type: Bolt Action, Internal Magazine Markings: There is no visible import mark.The top of the receiver is marked with an intact “chrysanthemum” (the Imperial ownership seal) and with three Japanese characters that translate to … This Nagoya Arsenal Type 14 Nambu is a nice little piece of history. The cavalry carbine is almost entirely different from the middle band forward with an under-folding bayonet, metal nosecap, stacking hook to the left side of the nosecap and wide front sight guards. Take care. There is a line on the left of the barrel shank that matches a line on the receiver. Below these marks on the frame are the Japanese character for “Showa” followed by the date code “16.1” and … The characters or pictographs will tell you what arsenal made it, there is one that is supposed to be what a pile of cannon balls stacked in a pyramid would look like viewed from the top (concentric circles kinda looking like a compressed … 0 Series (no series mark) Kokura Arsenal. Has nearly all the original blue. Although total production is unknown, it is estimated that approximately 100,000 were converted. Reserve . The Japanese never went beyond the second series of re-using the serial numbers on pistols, but with rifles they went far beyond it, using the entire 47 syllables of the IROHA poem and more. The bottom of the bayonet lug is marked “823”. All Japanese military rifles had serial numbers except extremely rare prototypes, other pre-production guns, and occasional rifles assembled very late in … The blade is flat without fullers and blued, and the crossguard is straight but still contoured on the side, which makes this the last pattern made by National Denki, which no longer had supervision from Nagoya arsenal. The left side of the receiver is marked (from left to right) with the faded “series” symbol, the serial number and with the symbol for Nagoya Arsenal. The wood is worn with a fair amount of dents and markings, it has a slanted duffle cut in the buttstock. Matching numbers are present on the bayonet lug, bolt handle and extractor claw. Disassembly shows matching cocking knob, bolt, trigger, and each of the penciled grips; unnumbered firing pin. The bayonet lug is marked with the last 3 digits of the serial number. Nagoya Arsenal: 1923-1945 : Jinsen Arsenal (Korea) 1923-1945: Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria) 1931-1945: Toyo Kogyo: 1939-1945 : Tokyo Juki Kogyo: 1940-1945: Tokyo Juki Kogyo: 1940-1945 : Howa Jyuko: 1940-1945 : Izawa Jyuko: 1940-1945 : 3. Nagoya Arsenal. The 7th series is the middle/end of the transition period between early and late (last ditch) configuration. There is no Kana (series symbol) preceding the serial number. This is followed by the serial number “88906”. The bottom of the safety, the firing pin, the extractor and the bottom of the bolt handle are each … Geokop. Inchon was the site of the first naval battle of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–05. T 2 Paratrooper 'Takedown' Rifles. T 99 Concentric Circle Marked Short Rifles. These rifles are not common to find (and rare to find Nagoya examples) and when they are found they are almost always missing their unique monopods as well as their dust … The serial number and a Nagoya Arsenal stamp are clearly marked above the bo-hi (fuller). Given the serial number, it seems probable that it's an 8th series rather than … It ticked many boxes: Nagoya made, looked clean, had a hooked quillion and the wooden grip and scabbard looked in decent shape. Missing parts including the hand guard, front barrel band, middle band springs, front and rear trigger guard screws, rear stock mounted sling swivels and butt plate and it’s screws. Features blade and folding ladder sights, a lightly struck mum next to the "99 Type" model marking, the properly displaced Nagoya stamp and serial number on the rear receiver ring, and smooth pistol grip stock with sling swivels and a cupped metal buttplate. 165 Posts . You need to describe the characters in preceeding the "serial number" and give me the first digits of the serial number and I can look it up in my son's book. Description: Right side with full serial number and 14.9 Date over arsenal symbols, reflecting manufacture in … Base of the bayonet is marked with serial number 63659, after the series marking. You are considering a used Japanese Nagoya Arsenal, Type 99 Series 5, made in 1943 — It’s chambered in 7.7x58mm Arisaka. What would the current value be in today's market? T 38 Long Rifles. The serial on the pommel is 23545 and there seems to be a very faint kana character before the number which I cannot make out. Nagoya arsenal from 1935 to 1942: 206,000 units (est.) T 99 Short Rifles. Save Share. Only about 38,000 were produced, 8,000 at Nagoya and 30,000 at Toyo Kogyo between summer of 1940 and spring of 1941 when production was switched to the much more common new Type 99 short rifle of which millions were made. The right side of the frame has a Nagoya Arsenal upside down “8” in a circle, followed by the Japanese character for “NAM” (for Lt. Gen Kijiro Nambu, one of the founders of the Nambu Rifle Manufacturing Company, the predecessor to Chuo Kogyo.). [12] Type 44 carbine [edit] Similar to the Type 38 carbine from the middle band back. when each series of each arsenal was manufactured. Description Additional information Description. You need to describe the characters in preceeding the 'serial number' and give me the first digits of the serial number and I can look it up in my son's book. Each series … Condition: Extremely high condition pistol with bright, original … As noted above, it is not series marked but seems to have features of both 7th and 8th series. The bottom of the bayonet lug is marked with the last three digits of the serial number. The rear of the dust cover is marked “667” and … The arsenal mark on the left side of the receiver at the end of the rifle serial number indicates this rifle was manufactured at the Nagoya Arsenal (1923-1945). This Nagoya Arsenal Type 14 (Nambu) is a semi-automatic handgun chambered in 8mm. Made only by Nagoya Arsenal and Toyo Kogyo under Kokura Arsenal supervision. Seller Description. The characters or pictographs will tell you what arsenal made it, there is one that is supposed to be what a pile of cannon balls stacked in a pyramid would look like viewed from the top (concentric circles kinda looking like a compressed olympic logo) … "Your rifle is a 7th series Type 99 Short Rifle produced by the Nagoya Arsenal. There is no consistency to serial numbers or arsenal marks as the rifles were converted from existing stock. T 99 … Nagoya Arsenal production with all matching serial numbers including the bolt. T 38 Short Rifles (Reworks) T 38 Folding Stock Carbines (Test Type 1) T 44 Calvary Carbines. The blade retains its fighting edge. Following outbreak of the Korean War, in 1950, Inchon was the site of the famous amphibious assault led by Gen. Douglas MacArthur, claiming one of … Correct type magazine nicely overstamped with matching serial number. In the picture at the left, the set of numbers after the … 1 in stock. Standard configuration early Type 94 with usual Japanese characters on the left side of the frame. The long rifle was found to be more cumbersome than the short rifle, and provided only … Required License(s): FFL, CNR Categories: Firearms, Pistol Tags: CNR, FFL, Japan, WWII. The T99 book I mentioned has a chart which lists all of the arsenals, and approx. This model … It was only until I asked the wife to check a few Japanese sites for possible serial numbers information that she pointed out that the screws were something to take note of according to Japanese sources. Reply. Right side of frame with Nagoya Arsenal symbols followed by full serial number. The bayonet is a Hooked quillon type. A spring-loaded brass muzzle cover is included. I have a Nagoya Series Two, which was assembled sometime during the second or third quarter of 1942---- probobly mid -second, as the serial number is between 40 and 41.000. There are several neat variations found in the 7th series. T 100 Paratrooper 'Takedown' Rifles. Discussion Starter • #1 • Aug 18, 2019. The blade has been armoury sharpened. The receiver has serial number 88484 and has two imperial flower stamps. Serrated wood panels. Frame dated 14.6 reflecting production in June 1939. Working order and excellent bore. T 38 Carbines. It is dated 16,1 (Jan 1941) with serial #21867 and only displays the Nagoya Arsenal symbol on the frame. Japan occupied Korea from 1905–1945. The cavalry carbine is almost entirely … Bring … T 99 Sniper Rifles . Nagoya Arsenal did not use a series number, ... Toyo Kogyo matched their rifles with a 3 digit assembly number unrelated to the serial number, while Nagoya matched the rifle with the last 3 digits of the serial number. The left side of the receiver is marked (from left to right) the serial number “32506” and the symbol for the Nagoya Arsenal. There is a line on the left of the barrel shank that matches a line on the receiver. These early war production Type 95 Shin Gunto were usually carried by career soldiers, not conscripts and were considered by many as a primary weapon. … The bottom of the safety, the firing pin, and the bottom of the bolt handle are all marked “870”. The 4x7 NTC Kogaku scope is numbered "13322" on top and "2758" on the right side of the integral mount. It's serial number is 3915 and made in 1929. The small Japanese character (kana) placed within a circle to the left of the serial number indicates this rifle is series 3. So far so good I guess, however the screws seem a little strange. The cast aluminium tsuka (hilt) retains over 90% of its original paint and is in excellent condition. The left side of the receiver is marked (from left to right) with a faded “series” symbol, the serial number and with the symbol for Nagoya Arsenal. Hoten/Mukden arsenal from 1938 to 1944: 52,300 units (est.) Nagoya arsenal from 1935 to 1942: 206,000 units (est.) A spring-loaded brass muzzle cover is included. Similar to the Type 38 carbine from the middle band back. The pommel is a contoured birdshead and the wooden grips are also contoured. That is until you start trying to fit the arsenal, era date and serial number in with known production dates and arsenals. 03man … There is a line on the left of the barrel shank that matches a line on the receiver. The barrel is 25.75″ long and the bore is bright and shiny and in good condition, no rust. The serial number was stamped on the left side of the receiver, followed by the arsenal symbol. In 1933 this scheme was replaced by a system in which rifles were numbered in blocks, or series, of 99,999 each actually 100,000, according to Honeycutt, running from serial numbers 0 through 99,999. T 44 Calvary Carbines. The serial number is 81676. This example was made at Jinsen Arsenal in Japanese-occupied Korea. Bid on Lot #689: Two Japanese Nagoya Arsenal Arisaka Bolt Action Military Rifles - Blade and ladder sights with anti-aircraft wings installed. Early like yours, classic 7th with thin metal buttplate, short sight, grooved safety and then finally a last … WW2 Japanese Nagoya Arsenal Arisaka Type 99 Rifle in 7.7 Japanese **Last Ditch** for sale online. Jinsen was the Japanese name for the Korean seaport of Inchon. The correct Nagaoya Arsenal marking seems to be present on the ricasso. It was likely produced in the Late 1943, early-mid 1944 period. I was wondering if this early T14 is considered on the rare side. The symbols stamped on the right ricasso indicate the bayonet was … It's all matching with one matching mag. The highest serial number known to exist of Nagoya arsenal, Toriimatsu factory produced Type 14 pistols is 73291 and has a date of Showa 20.8 or August of 1945. Initially, rifles make in Japanese arsenals were numbered consecutively within each Type designation. Type 44 carbine. T 99 Long Rifles.